I Am Not Your Inspiration: The Problem With Inspiration Porn

Disability doesn’t make you exceptional, but questioning what you think you know about it does.” – Stella Young

The danger of being viewed through the lense of the “inspiring cripple” archetype is that it was created by ableists as a tool used to invalidate those who are struggling. It means that people expect things from you that you weren’t even capable of before disability, muchless after. It’s such an unhealthy way of approaching people who are ill, as if we are not trying hard enough unless we can plaster a fake smile on our face and say we’re doing well, when actually we are struggling in ways that only a small percentage of the population can understand. The notion of the inspiring cripple does not leave room for the uncensored reality of the chronic illness spectrum.

If you are able-bodied and do not experience mental illness, I am not your inspiration. If something I say or write is helpful to another spoonie, then that is why I am here and it makes me happy to be helpful whenever possible, but I don’t want ableist individuals thinking that my refusal to cry in a corner every day makes me somehow better at being sick than someone who can’t stop sobbing and wishing for death. I am not any better.

I am not “trying harder” than anyone else and I will not be used to shame someone who feels like they can’t handle their condition. I still feel like I can’t handle being chronically ill on a regular basis.

I am not your feel-good story. I am a deeply flawed human being with constant, unrelenting chronic pain and many other debilitating conditions and symptoms, too. My choices are give up and die, or keep trying to find a reason to wake up and to put food in my mouth once a day. Sometimes that is a genuine struggle. Sometimes I do not get out of bed, and I do not put food in my body, and that does not make me pathetic or weak, it makes me sick. I have good days and bad days and I have given myself permission to have both.

I am so very tired of inspiration porn, aimed at the general public and unapologetically using those who are physically disabled, suffer chronic pain, or live with mental illness and/or neurodivergence. Inspiration porn wants you to say “well, it could be worse, I could be that poor person in a wheelchair or that teenager with a cane, therefore I’m not allowed to feel shitty, ever.”

Bull. Shit.

I am happy to answer any and all genuine questions about my life, my coping strategy, my illnesses, or anything else that someone is interested in, provided that the person asking is not just going to use my answers against me later. I am not interested in answering questions that are actually just thinly-veiled judgemental commentary on how I deal with my pain and other symptoms. I wish that my abled friends could just acknowledge that my reality is not something you can comprehend if you don’t live every second of every day in pain, knowing that the pain is life-long or progressive.

If you are not sick in a long-term sense, please try to understand why you cannot compare my life-altering, completely debilitating daily pain to the last time you had the flu, or the time you broke your arm, or even the car accident you were in, unless one of those things resulted in a long-term illness, disability, or chronic pain disorder. Flus, broken bones, and car accidents may be unpleasant, but after some healing your life resumed as planned, so you have no idea what it is like to live in my body, the body that has caused me to slowly, against my will, forget all my dreams and plans for the future. Please realize that every pain is experienced differently and is unique to each individual who is suffering. Comparison of one disabled person to another person, disabled or not, is never okay. We are not brave for the things healthy people think we are brave for. We are not brave for simply existing, we are not brave for going about our day as normally as we possibly can. Attitude does not differentiate a “good” cripple from a “bad” cripple. Inspiration porn is pure victim blaming, and society has unfortunately picked up this nasty habit.

Ableist propaganda would have us think that if we are not using our illness to transform ourselves into an inspiration, we are just wasting space and burdening those around us. Do not buy into that trash! I am sorry for each and every person who has ever felt like their pain or illness is the punchline to an ableist joke. Those of us who are ill are allowed to make jokes, we are allowed to seek out the humor in our situation, and it is despicable that people would use that coping mechanism against us. Yes, I use sarcasm to cope. Yes, I use humor to cope. No, that does not mean I’m cured or experiencing less pain or “getting better at dealing with it” as so many have said to me. It means that if I don’t laugh about this, it will crush me.

My medical decisions are not up for discussion unless you are another spoonie, and even then, I retain the freedom to completely ignore any and all medical advice that doesn’t come from my doctors. I even retain the right to ignore medical advice from doctors that does not make sense or goes against my beliefs.

I certainly won’t be basing my medical decisions off of an abled friend’s (ex-friend’s) suggestion because they feel like they have “observed my pain” (read: been annoyed by how much I talk about it) for long enough that they are unreasonably comfortable making sweeping declarations about my use of medication, or with stating that I “pity myself” (read: retreat from overwhelming and triggering situations so I can take care of myself appropriately) sometimes. Fuck yeah, I do pity myself sometimes. I refuse to apologize for that.

The abled seem to possess an unlimited capacity to confuse my online and in-person honesty and unwillingness to sugar-coat reality with what they view as pity-seeking behavior and weakness. Saying I have an incurable illness is not pitying myself, it is the truth. I am allowed to speak the truth, my truth, and I am allowed to remark at the depressing reality of chronic pain. Ableism makes accepting the reality of our illness that much more difficult. If I said I never have moments of self-pity I would be lying, and that helps no one. I have every right to be upset about my conditions and to grieve over the losses in my life as a result. And so do other spoonies at any point in their journey.

It is just grotesque that there are people self-righteously using those of us struggling with mental illness, cancer, or chronic invisible illness (to name a few) as their motivation, or to shame others with similar struggles. I don’t want my accomplishments to ever be used to make someone feel inadequate.

The myths that are perpetuated by inspiration porn make it harder to be honest about what we as spoonies experience, which is why it’s time to start calling ableism out wherever and whenever we see it. Just because one person with MS can work a full time job does not mean that another MS patient is faking their inability to work. It’s such a simple thing, to validate someone, yet we don’t do it enough.

You wouldn’t worry about being polite when calling out racism or homophobia, so why would you worry about offending people when you call out their discriminatory attitudes towards chronic illness, disability, neurodivergence, mental illness, and chronic pain?

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About Jessi Finds Out Fibro

Hi, and thank you for finding your way to my corner of the web! I'm on a journey to empower myself and hopefully others through shared courage and compassion. I write Finding Out Fibro, a chronic illness and chronic pain awareness blog that is not just about fibromyalgia, as well as a new project making jewelry under the Etsy name Hopeful Spoon. Please check out the shop and share if you can! Thank you for your support! My other hobbies include defeating ableism anywhere I find it, upcycling old junk into funky awesomeness, raising my voice to erase stigma against invisible illness and mental illness, baking, collecting vintage kitchen ware, sharing body-positive messages, playing around in photoshop, abstract painting (especially in neons and metallics!), advocating for those living with chronic illnesses and mental health challenges, seeking safety and upholding visibility for LGBTQIA individuals living with physical and mental disabilities, researching and testing plant-based remedies for chronic pain, and spending all my spare spoons in my veggie garden. This is my opportunity to do more than just survive with chronic illness. This is me learning how to live well, even though there is no cure for the war my body is waging on me.

34 responses to “I Am Not Your Inspiration: The Problem With Inspiration Porn”

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      You are very welcome. It was one of those posts I wanted to write for a long time. It was the post I wanted to write when I started this blog, but I didn’t have the courage to say what I needed to say. I just want spoonies to be sweeter to each other, really. I have met no one but complete angels here, and I am so grateful for that, but I see people getting horrible comments all the time that are directed toward their illness, and sometimes those comments come from within the chronic illness community and that is just so wrong. Compassion, not judgement. We are all in this together, even if we are in completely different places in our journey.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. escharae says :

    Very well said. In the MS community we joke about some MS ads that showcase people doing incredible things. It’s like, “Who the hell can do that?” and “Are they trying to make us feel guilty if we can’t?” People should set goals for themselves regardless of everyone else, because we’re all so different. And we should always try to be better than we once were, not better than other people. Thank you for writing about this topic with such clarity and assertiveness.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      Aw thank you! I agree, the ads for fibro make me sick, too. “with Lyrica I have my life back” etc. Gag me. No, no I actually do not.
      You’re absolutely right, my progress is only measured against myself, not others with fibro, because it is so different for all of us, and with comorbid conditions it gets even more confusing. I constantly have friends (or not so great friends, I guess) saying things like “I don’t know why it’s taking you so long to figure it out, my mom has it and just takes some pills and is fine” or “I know someone who has that and they can still work and drive, why don’t you want to work?” or “You’re only 26, how could you just give up so easily?” UGHHHH. I would sell various organs to be able to work again, truly. Accepting limitations in order to keep yourself functioning somewhat is not giving up.
      I wrote this because I see people getting down on themselves, and i notice that I do it to myself too, if the words that are typed come out too bitter or too real. But people who are ill need to see that they don’t have to be some able-bodied person’s throw-away inspiration, they can be their own inspiration, just like you said.
      Some chronically ill folks are just too sick and too tired to make improvements or to have a good attitude, and I still know those people deserve to be loved and treated with respect. There’s a lot out there telling us to buck up and try harder and be stronger, but not a lot telling us it’s okay to have bad days or weeks or months, and that not everyone in the world thinks someone failed because they need to take a time out from life. This whole thing arose from the “#CripplePunk” hashtag on Tumblr, something I hope to write about soon because I am fully on board. CripplePunk is about not having to be the “good cripple” or the inspirational disabled person or the sick person with the great attitude, especially not all the time. I like that. More compassion and humanity, less putting people down for being wherever they are in their journey.
      I had years where I did not want to improve my attitude, I just wanted to magically be healthy again, and I was afraid to start writing because I didn’t want to come across as the only asshole who didn’t “appreciate the gift” that illness had given them. Now I see that the sooner I had started to write, the sooner I would have found acceptance. I want others to feel free to write the hard stuff, the too much information stuff, the most awful parts of being ill, because blogging should be therapeutic and our community should not come across as only for those who are interested in bettering themselves right now. Everyone should feel welcome.
      Thank you so much for replying, and I was hesitant to use MS for my example, but it is an illness that is as variable as my own (and one that many keep insisting I must have for my fibro to be as bad as it is… sigh, because fibro is not a real illness, ya know). The people I know with multiple sclerosis are all incredible people who try their fucking hardest, but they all have wildly different ability levels. It would be ridiculous and horrible for my friend who can still drive and work as a hospice care RN to look down on my friend who can’t work because her flare ups are too intense and there are few good days and her medications help very little.
      Fibro is the same, some of my friends can do everything they could do before and are great moms and hold down full time jobs on their feet, but not most of us… invisible illnesses are so hard, they don’t need to be any harder!!! I didn’t even realize how badly internalized ableism had affected me until about a month ago, and I’ve been reflecting on it every since. I guess it turned into this vehement post somehow. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • escharae says :

        It’s funny that you mention the “appreciate the gift” trend. A lot of people say they are grateful for their illness, and I don’t understand that. Maybe I haven’t yet reached that high state of mind yet, but I just don’t. I mean, I can sit down and recognize that my illness led to some positive changes in my lifestyle and that has made me appreciate the people around me who are definitely people to keep, but it’s also brought hardships I wouldn’t have dreamed of. I’m not grateful for having MS. I can accept it, I can learn from it, but it’s not going to get my gratitude. At least not yet.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. spiritdragon says :

    So much this! I am nearly done with vet school and all I get is how much of an “inspiration” I am because I trudge through something able people struggle to accomplish while being half-dead with fibro. And yet, when I go through my day putting on my mask and smiling and pushing myself in ways I shouldn’t, I then get sideways glances like I must not actually be disabled because I’m not showing it. Assholes, make up your fucking minds.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      ((hugs)) totally been there! I worked through the first two years of fibro, and got that same are-you-faking-it underhanded comments and sly snarky eyerolls. Invisible disability is very, very, very hard. I admire that you deal with that every day and that you are working so hard. I wish you didn’t have to hurt your body to prove your work ethic, but I know that is how it is, unfortunately. It sucks to be judged when you’re actually working ten times harder than them just to keep up appearances.
      Best of luck with finishing up vet school, and all the spoons!!! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Zyp Czyk says :

    Right on, Jessi! Love the way you say it like it is.

    Our culture these days is all about positivity and performance, and if you don’t have lots of both, you’re a “loser”.

    This country has a militaristic attitude that views everything through the lens of wining vs losing and with typical black-and-white thinking, if you’re not winning, you’re losing – some folks can’t even conceive of a middle ground. We’re either heroes or losers, so if we’re not heroes…

    We are expected to assume the role, to fake it if necessary, and it doesn’t matter whether it’s real of not because everyone is looking at the outside. They’ll see what they expect to see – we have no control over that.

    I’ve heard said: “What other people think of me is none of my business”. Maybe that’s a good way to approach it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. abodyofhope says :

    OMG! When I saw this, I almost laughed out loud and killed my head bc I recently wrote “You are not an inspirational unicorn” but still have not published it, lol. You say everything I think about on a daily basis! So cheering this on.

    It’s one thing for me, or for you to find the good in your struggle, and try to make good what you can from pain, sickness, depression, etc., right? That IS inspiring. But then, people start expecting ONLY the good. They forget the pieces of good were born from the darkness you continue to live in. The struggle never changes. But the expectation from those around you change dramatically. They want you to be an inspirational machine, when you are just trying to survive. You are dead on. It minimizes illness, and makes it one dimensional.
    I wish people could just take us at face value, the good with the bad.
    This was awesome, Jess! Woop woop!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      Yayyy!!! I was waiting for you to see this one, because I wanted your opinion specifically! I am so glad it resonates with you. I’m shocked it resonated so much that you reblogged it, I’m gonna have this warm fuzzy feeling for the rest of the week from that!!! Thank you, love!
      And I cannot wait to read your Inspirational Unicorn post. I just spit coffee out my nose a little bit when I read that title for the first time. Seriously. I. Can. Not. Wait.
      I love this comment, I want to print it out and keep it in my purse.
      I agree, it’s wonderful for us to find inspiration in each other’s hopeful actions or attitudes or faith, *when* we know and appreciate the long hard battle to arrive at that point, But YES, there would be no inspirational moments without many, many more spent slogging through the mud. spoonies are celebrating each other for the struggle, the fight, and the enduring of the unendurable, and that is fantastic. Too much focus on the results is not fantastic and turns our struggle into something black and white, which it will never, ever be. It will always be complicated, too complicated for people to understand if they are only willing to base what I’m going through or what you are going through off of their own previous experiences.
      I dealt with pain and migraines and severe stomach problems and the worst immune system as a kid, but because I never acknowledged my struggle even to myself, I never felt like a strong survivor, I always felt like a weak victim and I always felt trapped. But everything I ever experienced before chronic illness reared its head more clearly was just child’s play, by comparison. So it is irritating that people think they can compare their distant memories or experiences of pain with my body’s current failure to perform. It’s gotta be even more intense for you to deal with because people think “Oh, I have RSD, I know what she’s going through” and RSD is not what took your life and upended it, RSD was a minor roadblock, compared to POTS and IH.
      We don’t want pity, but to be treated like our struggles matter just as much as our triumphs, if not more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • abodyofhope says :

        When I read this message from you yesterday, I said “WOW” probably like 100x to myself. You got it right on point, girl. Thank you for that!
        That is something I have never been able to say out loud to anyone since most of my social networking friends are still from the RSD community, but I have felt very displaced for a long time.
        I’m very sorry that you were sick as a kid. Even if it didn’t compare to the intense illness you face now, I’m sorry your illness journey started as a child. That makes me want to reach through the computer and squeeze you tight…
        The way others put so much emphasis on one little thing we say, one picture, one poster can be infuriating. More than celebrating a tiny victory, they expecting that everything is all better now- and then we must explain how bad we are all over again and disappoint again and again. Like a cycle. It drives me bonkers to be honest. When working on goals, people can help you get extremely frustrated very very quickly when they constantly assume you are fine because of one little thing you say. Hence my long break from social networking…
        I am very grateful to have people like you who understand chronic illness for what it is. As you said, good lives WITH struggle. They aren’t separate like people enjoy believing.
        Wonderful post, Jess! I am so excited about it 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  5. abodyofhope says :

    Reblogged this on aBodyofHope and commented:
    My good friend at one of my favorite blogs, Findingoutfibro wrote this amazing post below!
    Finding the good in your struggle and using it positively is definitely something to be celebrated; however, when others forget the good you choose to share is born from the daily struggle you STILL live in…that is where the problem lies. Please continue reading:

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Kathleen says :

    If it wouldn’t cause me greater pain, I would be standing and applauding!! (I have RSD) Thank you so much for this post! You summed it up eloquently!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      Thank you so much Kathleen! That means so much to me. I felt like such a jerk when I decided to write this, and I’m really glad I’m not alone in being fed up with the way paint patients are viewed as people to pity or people to look down on or people to be motivated by, but never just as people who struggle and are doing their best and who shouldn’t have to perform to be loved and appreciated. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  7. livingwithobstacles says :

    You nicely and perfectly said. I applaud how genuine you are and how it comes out perfectly in your writing. Thanks for sharing with us..

    Liked by 1 person

  8. sarahallegra says :

    Oh my god, thank you for this post!! This is something that I “know” on an intellectual level, but have a very hard time maintaining whenever I actually encounter it in real life. Like you, I have good days and bad days and many different ways of coping with them. Some days I have to talk myself into just continuing to live… and that is SHOCKING to most people. I rarely bring it up because it only leads to people wondering about my mental health and suggesting I try anti depressants (which I’ve already tried, but people can’t help but want to fix you).

    The thing is, I don’t see how ANY normal human being who is put in the situation of being in pain every second of every day and having their life as they planned it ruined without any real hope of recovering it WOULDN’T consider the worthwhileness of living. I just don’t buy that other people would be “better than that” in my situation or that I’m “just depressed.” (Also, I have been clinically depressed off and on for YEARS. It’s no joke either. And it did make me consider killing myself on many occasions. But the reasons behind both are quite different; they’re apples and oranges. I never want to minimize depression or other mental health issues, it’s just not what I’m talking about in this case.)

    Mourning the death of the life you thought you would lead is perfectly natural and should absolutely be allowed… and that can last for a long, long time. It can go away and come back. Mourning follows no rules of politeness, it does what it wants, when the fuck it wants. But if we are sad about our situation 5 years after it started, we’re “wallowing”. ARG.

    There is a huge societal pressure to “be positive” and “keep your chin up” and while that can be helpful to a degree, it’s not healthy to constantly mask your actual feelings just so other people can feel better about your shitty situation. Basically, I could not agree with you more on this, it’s something I really needed to hear, and THANK YOU for writing it! Thank you so very, very much, from one spoonie to another 🙂 I’m sending this post to another friend of mine, also a spoonie. He’s a bit newer to spoonie-ness so I think he’ll appreciate this. Thank you!! ❤

    Liked by 3 people

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      First of all, I just fangirled so much!!! You are such an artistic inspiration for me, and I can (and do) spend hours looking at a single photograph that you’ve taken and edited. I was a fan of yours before I was sick, and my intense love for your work has only gotten more personal and deeper still as the years pass. I find enormous comfort in your work as well as creative energy that fuels me to grab a paint brush no matter how awful it feels. I don’t know if it’s the details or the spilling and cascading of gossamer fabrics or the beauty of yourself and your models that you bring out through your photography, but I feel like I am occupying the same space as the subject of each picture. There are a million other reasons I have an artistic crush on you, but I will save it for fangirl-y comments on your blog, lol.
      Second, YES, yes, yes and more yessssss. “Mourning follows no rules of politeness, it does what it wants, when the fuck it wants. But if we are sad about our situation 5 years after it started, we’re “wallowing”.” <——– Those two sentences capture so much of our struggle as people living with chronic illness. No two struggles are the same, but there are similarities that we can all agree on, and one of them is how we are expected to behave, and how we are expected to cope with unbearable things as if they are bearable. If there is a universal spoonie experience, that is it. Grief is very messy, and it is forever. Just like when I "came out" to my friends in high school, I have to continue to come out (or not) every time I meet someone new. Grief is like that, you think it's a one time deal, one chunk of your life sacrificed to the alter of grief and then suddenly you will be free to move on. That simply isn't the case. My boyfriend lost his father to a stroke two days after I found out that I had fibro. His grief and my grief, though not comparable at all; the loss of a father is much much worse than my illness; but our moods and the fragile state we have both been in mentally for the last two and a half years proves that there will of course still be days where grief is second to joy and happiness, but grief will never completely go away.
      I know what you mean about pre-existing depression versus the horror of being in a body that won't obey your will any longer, and I couldn't agree more. They are two completely different beasts and though it's hard for to put into words what is different from one to the other, I just know that what I am experiencing lately is not simple depression, nowhere even close. Still, depression is very much involved and is one of many components of this chronic illness journey. It's weird, but I feel like I have actually healed some of the pre-existing mental health struggles that I always lived with and this new secondary depression from having chronic intractable pain is more based on the re-wiring of my brain that results from severe and untreated pain.
      When you said you had to talk yourself into living, I wanted to hug you, and all spoonies, because we might not talk about it, but we almost all deal with weighing and pros and cons of continuing to exist, and we are almost all conditioned to believe that makes our pain less valid, when it should be met with the opposite reaction.
      Thank you so much for your amazing comment, and for sharing your art with the world. I frequently direct people to your work to help them understand what I'm going through because words can only do so much. I'm sure I'm not the only spoonie who identifies that strongly with your art!!! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • sarahallegra says :

        Oh my gosh! You totally made my day! I sometimes hear from people (especially spoonies) that my work resonated with them, but not nearly to the degree you’re talking about! Thank you so much! I was fangirling off being fangirled 😉 Gossamer fabrics are kind of magical things (hence my using them a lot, heheh). Your comments totally made my morning and I so appreciated you taking the time to say all that! Thank you!

        Also, thank you again for this excellent post. From the responses it’s gotten, I’m not the only one who’s been responding to it! There is that weird line you’re “supposed” to walk of being inspirationally ill while looking just sick enough, but not too sick. Then you’re wallowing. Or faking being sick. I wasn’t really a big fan of people in general before I got sick, but it hasn’t helped any, lol.

        I know what you mean about feeling like you have to “come out” every time you meet a new person. I totally feel the exact same way. I try to judge the right time to tell them, and how to say it, so that I don’t sound like I’m asking for sympathy, but just explaining why I really can’t help them move (or whatever). It’s obnoxious. But I always worry people are just going to think I’m a lazy slacker if I don’t actively tell them that I have ME (and then I have to explain what ME IS) but I don’t want to sympathy-mongering either… sigh.

        I’m sorry for your boyfriend’s loss of his father 😦 That must have been an incredibly heavy blow. And yes, while our grief isn’t exactly the same, it’s still grief and it’s still valid. I was supposed to help my husband with a short video he’s filming this weekend. The last week has felt like one solid migraine because the temperature spiked really high here in Los Angeles (heat always does that to me, but I’m pretty fine in cold). We both kind of realized at the same time, I can’t be on his crew because I CANNOT commit to being there. And it would be a long day of shooting, lots of walking, etc… even if I was well enough to go, it probably wouldn’t be the best idea for my health. But even still, I felt so sad that I had “let him down,” (my feelings, not his, he was fine) and like I wasn’t a worthy person anymore because I had to back out of something I’d said I would do. And I realize it’s not my fault, this is a much smarter choice, he found a healthy replacement no problem, he’s not upset, etc, but it still doesn’t make me feel like less of a piece of shit who can’t pull my own weight. I’m guessing you’ll understand how I’m feeling.

        I’m sort of glad that your depression has changed/improved? since you got sick – it sounds like now, if you were magically cured of fibro, the depression would go away too (or am I misunderstanding you?) I feel like a lot of mine would lift too, but it’s pretty well imprinted on my spirit; I think it’s one of those genetic things for me which I may always deal with on some level, apart from whatever happens with my body. (And anti depressants and I do NOT get along.) But yes, clinical depression and being depressed cuz you’re sick are two TOTALLY different things!

        I had a friend over the other day who has her own mental and physical health struggles and it was SO GREAT to be able to talk about “Oh, this was a time I didn’t feel like living, but I did,” without worrying that we’d scare anyone or send them calling our therapists, etc. Lol, it was so freeing! I wish we were more free to talk about it in society; I think it would take away a lot of the pain and shame we feel, but that’s going to be its own long struggle. Though some progress has been made, I think, in recent years. Thank you for the virtual hugs, I’m sending them back to you 🙂

        Thank you for directing people toward my art! That means the world to me 🙂 Since you’re an admitted fan, I wanted to let you know that I’m doing a print giveaway to raise awareness about ME and May 12th: https://sarahallegra.wordpress.com/2015/05/05/my-kingdom-of-me-and-a-print-giveaway/ It’s free and easy to enter if you’d like 🙂 The print I’m giving away hasn’t been released yet, but it’s going to be an Enchanted Sleep/DreamWorld crossover piece and will be REALLY beautiful! No pressure of course, but I didn’t want you to miss out on it if you wanted to enter!

        Thank you again SO MUCH for your lovely, uplifting words on all subjects! I’m glad to have found such a kindred spirit 🙂 Wishing you many spoons!

        Liked by 1 person

  9. livingwithobstacles says :

    Reblogged this on livingwithobstacles and commented:
    such a great post from a great writer!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. pattyalcala says :

    I am in total agreement. You are doing a great job of explaining how demeaning people can be by the words that they use. I love how you talked about humor being a coping mechanism. I couldn’t believe when my son would be so hilarious and have everyone in stitches, then they would tell how much better he was. I’m sorry, I had to laugh! He was just a funny kid. It certainly didn’t ease the pain at all. I like what you’re doing. Keep getting the word out with all that honesty that you possess.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. pattyalcala says :

    Hi Jessi, I am nominating you for the Premio Dardos Award. Go here: http://sberrypa.com/2015/05/22/premio-dardos-award/. If you decline for any reason, I will not be offended. I have been enjoying your blog and your honesty. I also appreciate you coming and reading what I have to say on my blog.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      Aw, you are too sweet! I will accept it, of course, thank you so much! I enjoy your blog too, a great deal, and will be over there today. You are wonderful, and you’ve always been so kind and insightful. I just started following your other blog, too.
      Lots of love!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Fibro Chick says :

    Jess, this is a great post. You’ve managed to put into words what I’ve been feeling for a long long time. Thankyou.
    L. X

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Fibro Chick says :

    Jessi, are you still here? I sent you an Encouraging Thunder award last week, but you don’t seem to have seen it……..

    L. X

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      Whoops, brain fog is not my friend lately, I am so sorry I didn’t reply right away, I meant to and then it disappeared under life stuff. I am still here, I am still writing, it’s just been awhile since I actually posted any of it for some reason, but I will get right on accepting that award, thank you so much love! I really appreciate your kind words and the nomination both!!! ❤ ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Adam Byrne says :

    You are an increadable woman im jealous of whoever gets to keep you to themselves at night
    Your outlook and no holds barred cut the crap attitude is a breath of freash air
    I wish you luck and more good days than bad

    Liked by 1 person

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