How Vanity Saved Me

All of this, right down to the 50 pound weight gain and the transition from gabapentin to lyrica, and my own detox experience off of both drugs (HORRENDOUS). All of this needs to be discussed with patients before a doctor decides to put them on Lyrica because opiates are being criminalized. Lyrica helps some people, but the rest of us feel poisoned on it. I’m so mad I let my doctor talk me into going back on it after I spent 7 months painfully and slowly detoxing off of it.

The Sick Diva

A note from the author-This is my personal story and though these medication may work wonders for some they had very negative side effects for me. Also, I am not a doctor, or a medical professional I am just sharing my experience.

How Vanity May Have Saved Me

and

Are your Meds Making You Sicker?

My sister was about to marry her high school sweetheart, I had done everything I could to lose the fifty pounds I had gained since I had been put on Lyrica and Gabapentin for my Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. Six weeks prior to her wedding I had spent in complete bed rest and to be honest I almost didn’t go, but I dearly love my sister, and I wouldn’t miss it for the world no matter how sick I was. Turns out I was really, really sick. It was four years since my diagnosis…

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About Jessi Finds Out Fibro

Hi, and thank you for finding your way to my corner of the web! I'm on a journey to empower myself and hopefully others through shared courage and compassion. I write Finding Out Fibro, a chronic illness and chronic pain awareness blog that is not just about fibromyalgia, as well as a new project making jewelry under the Etsy name Hopeful Spoon. Please check out the shop and share if you can! Thank you for your support! My other hobbies include defeating ableism anywhere I find it, upcycling old junk into funky awesomeness, raising my voice to erase stigma against invisible illness and mental illness, baking, collecting vintage kitchen ware, sharing body-positive messages, playing around in photoshop, abstract painting (especially in neons and metallics!), advocating for those living with chronic illnesses and mental health challenges, seeking safety and upholding visibility for LGBTQIA individuals living with physical and mental disabilities, researching and testing plant-based remedies for chronic pain, and spending all my spare spoons in my veggie garden. This is my opportunity to do more than just survive with chronic illness. This is me learning how to live well, even though there is no cure for the war my body is waging on me.

6 responses to “How Vanity Saved Me”

  1. mini2z says :

    I take Gabapentin but only occasionally for neuropathy but I find it really doesn’t help
    Now if there was a magic drug to stop my itching I’d sign up (oh yeah that’s prednisone and I will only take it as a last resort)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

      What dosage are you at for “as-needed” Gabapentin? I was told over and over again by doctors that it will not help my neuropathy unless I take it every day at a relatively high dose for at least 3-6 weeks without missing a dose. Once you’ve reached that 3-6 weeks, it does start to relieve neuropathy, but at a huge cost. And once you’re on it for say 6 weeks, it’s REALLY hard to get off of. I’ve done it three times, no fun. My boyfriend was also prescribed as-need Gabapentin and it does literally NOTHING for him to take it that way, and he was also given 100mg pills and told to take between 1-6. Total irresponsibility on behalf of his doctor to prescribe that for his hip pain instead of giving him painkillers to help, those work on an as needed basis, whereas Gabapentin and Lyrica and antidepressant were all made to be taken for months and months to obtain and maintain effectiveness, and I think it’s totally messed up that any doctors are out there prescribing these things for occasional severe pain, either on as needed basis or round the clock. It’s just irresponsible. They never tell patients the truth about these meds, or the truth about how hard they are to get off of once you are taking them every day. Even skipping a dose when I was taking it every day, three times a day, just one dose skipped left me feeling ‘off’ for two weeks, but the day I skipped it I always had great energy, as my brain peeked through the cobwebs briefly to remind me it was still there, sleeping.
      I’m sorry you have a doctor who lied to you about the fundamental way that the Gabapentin/Gralise/Lyrica/pregabalin family actually works, which is when it actually builds up in your system. Not that I recommend doing that, ever.
      Gabapentin, I was surprised to learn, does make an excellent topical pain reliever for pinched nerves in my spine, and neuropathy in my feet, though! That DOES work on as as-needed basis.
      I would love to find something that stopped my itching from fibro and candida sometimes too. if you ever find something, LET ME KNOW!!!! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mini2z says :

        My neuropathy is only in my feet “so far” and it’s 100 – 200 mgs at bedtime but it doesn’t make me sleepy at all. My hubby has used it for his occasional neuropathy too he’s a T1 diabetic and that dose works for him too – most times…

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

          Yeah 100-200 mg once a day wouldn’t touch my neuropathy in the slightest…. they had me up to 2400 mg a day (800 mg 3x day) before I knew what hit me. I was on and off of Gabapentin and Gralise (the extended release version which was even harder to detox from) for about 2 years, then they threw Lyrica into the mix and they literally WILL NOT let me stop taking it. I took myself off it painstakingly over the course of the last seven months, only to be told I had to start taking it again or they wouldn’t help me anymore. Sometimes I just don’t even know what’s going on with the system today…. I don’t know who/what to blame other than pure greed of corporations benefiting from the sale of these only partially useful meds that are more difficult to get off of a dose of than heroin. Also, getting pregnant while on either drug, gabas or lyrica, carries a HIGH risk of neural tube deformities which usually cause spontaneous abortions. The neural tube develops around the fourth week after conception so most women would not have enough warning to take themselves off it in the case of an accidental pregnancy. They also never ever warn women of that, which is just a terrible mistake, in my opinion. I’m 26 and I would need to spend several years preparing for pregnancy in the state that I’m in…. but my doctor won’t let me off the damn Lyrica rollercoaster from hell to even try to get ready or lose the 50 pounds I gained on it. 😦

          Like

          • mini2z says :

            I fought to get Thyroid (Canadian version of a natural dessicated thyroid medication) and it works for me. Synthyroid did nada
            I refuse to take any cholesterol meds as all have made the neuropathy worse.
            I do have a rx for a muscle relaxer with codeine and a med that I take for my migraines. My other meds are the effexor (generic) and three (yes THREE) different pill for my sugar. I’ll be begging again for insulin and plaquenil – I know the risks with plaquenil but the only other med is a chemo drug and the plaquenil takes 3-6 months to start to work – the build up – I’m so frustrated and I hate my Rhuemy and there just isn’t anyone else to go to….

            Liked by 1 person

            • Jessi Finds Out Fibro says :

              ❤ ❤ ❤ I'm so sorry your Rheumy isn't the best… I'm dealing with this now, but to be choosing between plaquinel and chemo drugs, I really feel for you and wish your rheumy was someone you could trust. I have round the clock tramadol as my pain relief and it does a little but probably about as much as your codeine muscle relaxer combo (I also take clonazepam for anxiety and spasm, both).
              It's really horrible how we are treated as patients. I wish I could fix it, but I can only complain about it as loudly as possible and encourage others to do the same, until our voices are eventually heard. Every time you tell your story, here, anywhere, you are advancing the cause of chronic pain and chronic illness patients everywhere, and you are advocating for yourself and for others. Thank you for sharing your story, thank you for being a leader in the movement to change how chronic illness is treated and perceived, both. ❤ I hope you can get some kind of relief and the medication you know you need but that your doctor won't listen to you on. That is particularly heartbreaking, when we know what will help and we can't get it. Time for that to come to an end!!!

              Liked by 1 person

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